Home Forums Guitar Instructor Doug Marks Suggestion -> Metal Method: Expanded Concepts

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    • #37990
      Shroud1969
      Participant

      Just continuing a thought from my previous thread that involved more instruction on vibrato.

      I am loving the MM lessons and methodology, I’m about 1/2 way through – puttering along nicely. I probably could be moving quicker, but feel like I’m trying to nail each fundamental. Right now I’m in the “Pentatonic Zone” wearing out GP, pushing my BPMs. Because of this, I feel like I’m frequently looking up supplemental material on YouTube – which is OK but often a lengthy process to find what I need and I’d like having a more systematic method with instructors that I already like.

      I would love to see an “expanded concepts” pack or packs. In my thinking – I would see these as similar, but ancillary, to the Complete Method. Not necessarily competitive with other instructors (in fact, could even point to their courses). Maybe 4-8 videos each, with the usual Tab, Tracks, and Video focuses specifically on a given skill, with the goal of relative mastery of the concept. (Mastery = good for most stuff – not super advanced.)

      Just some ideas here – you might organize it differently:

      – Vibrato and Bends (more vibrato)
      – Tapping (Maybe Mumm and MAB cover this pretty well)
      – Timing and Rhythm – counting, pickup notes, chord anticipations – my timing is generally good but needs to be better, I struggle hard with foot tapping
      – Barre and Power Chord Mayhem – (Expanded concepts and more practice – varying rhythms and dynamics)
      – Open Chord expansions
      – Guitar Fills
      – Jamming – jamming with others – two guitarists, playing with a bassist/drummer, when and what to solo, etc.
      – Theory and Songwriting (I’m not as into this but many folks would enjoy it – would be useful theory wise)
      – More Legato work
      – 7-8 String guitars

      I realize some areas are pretty well covered by other instructors – like lead playing and modes (Sarah), speed (MAB), classical shred (Mumm).

      Thanks for entertaining my musings…

      • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Shroud1969.
    • #37992
      Igglepud
      Participant

      Sarah Spisak Platinum Package

      Also look at Rhythm Extreme on Will’s page and Monster Power Chords on DJ’s.

      That will cover everything except jamming and tapping. Tapping might even be in there, but I haven’t gone through it all yet.

      MY ROCK IS FIERCE!!!

    • #37994
      superblonde
      Keymaster

      Check out Dee J’s lessons for the “Barre and Power Chord Mayhem – (Expanded concepts and more practice – varying rhythms and dynamics)” Really, Dee J’s got amazingly awesome stuff there, and includes a descriptive lesson book.

      Also Dee J’s lessons have amazing solos to learn but they are more advanced compared to the Pentatonic Zone of Doug’s lessons, I’d say save them for later.

      “– Tapping (Maybe Mumm and MAB cover this pretty well)”

      This will be in the later solo of Doug’s course. (Week 35 or so…)

      “– Jamming – jamming with others – two guitarists, playing with a bassist/drummer, when and what to solo, etc.”

      There’s Dee J’s backing track package. Dee J’s Monster Power Chords book gives a lot of examples for classic rock songs to study in conjunction with each exercise (for example, Heart). But in my varied attempts of playing with other local amateur musicians it always comes down to 1 thing and 1 thing only: the specific songs they want to play. For example out of nowhere my guitarist friend insisted on covering an REO Speedwagon song so then I had to figure out what to play there. But I never could have guessed that REO Speedwagon would be something to work out. Out of nowhere the band leader says “Let’s add Hush to the playlist and we can perform it next month at the brewery show.” What! 5 weeks to completely learn 9 song-specific lead licks written by the top hard rock guitarist of all time? Whoa, no pressure or anything! Or the drummer says they want to play 5 other specific songs I never would have guessed, all KANSAS.. Lessons can’t really cover these aspects of jam life. Although experienced musicians make it look easy, like “okay we just showed up at a garage and started playing some songs,” it has never worked out that way for me, there is always homework involved and it takes multiple weeks and multiple jam sessions to get anywhere (assuming everyone does their own homework! Which is not guaranteed either). So the real lesson is simply, learn as many songs as you can, like Doug says in the course, try to work up to learning 1 song per week. Start making your own “bar band” set list and start going through it yourself.. so when you meet the bass player you can say “ok I know these 3 creedence songs, and these 2 beatles songs and this black sabbath song” and you go from there.

      The best jam lesson overall skill-wise might be Doug’s “rock n roll” lesson which was.. week 12 or something?

      I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! ♯ ♮ ♭ ø ° Δ ♩ ♪ ♫ ♬
      And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

    • #37995
      Shroud1969
      Participant

      Thanks for the suggestions!

      When are we getting another flash sale Sarah!?

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Shroud1969.
    • #37997
      Shroud1969
      Participant

      @Superblonde

      Thanks for the thoughts.

      I’m feeling the same and finding that once you are past campfire type songs a lot of licks/techniques/transitions/rhythms are very genre/guitarist/band/song specific. Then some songs have multiple guitars that you have to (re)arrange in a band setting so that you at least capture most of the recognizable bits.

      I confess to loving me some REO Speedwagon.

      Hush as in Deep Purple or Tool?

    • #37999
      superblonde
      Keymaster

      Deep Purple Hush. By the holiest of all holy godlike guitarists. Yikes, I sure complained nonstop here about having to cram hard practice time for that performance, I was wearing my fingers out every day trying to get at least 5 of the many licks in that song up to speed. They’re all different! Ultimately I pulled it off but wow it was a sacrifice (of which band mates of course did not realize or want to hear about, and hence, they gave me another hard solo the next week, again “to be able to play by next week”, sheeeeesh – meanwhile the lead singer would only practice a song a few times in his car on the drive over to weekly rehearsal, talk about unequal effort).

      I should have mentioned, remember that Doug’s course includes the huge collection of ~80 amazing licks (week 39+). Those 3 lick lessons are massive and could last a year just by themselves. I havent mastered them, not a bit, though I’ve tried a few times. Learn the licks and then they can be played during any blues or improv jam. For cover songs it always sounds best to learn the real licks from the track but in a jam situation.. pull out the creativity and any memorized patterns. Well, I described somewhere on the forum (over 1 year ago now I suppose) about getting together with my old jam buddies for regular full saturdays yet got a bit fed up that they’d never do their own song-homework so to bypass the nonsense I loaded up my tablet with youtube “A-minor backing tracks” (like, 6+ hours worth of tracks, I have a huge backing track playlist I collected on my youtube channel, all in A-minor) and ignored all their comments and instead played the backing track and start jamming along. It helps to be the one who volunteers to set up the PA for the jam, lol. They kept protesting for about 15 mins but then started to get really into the improv (taking turns to fool around attempting licks & scale runs) then in future weeks started requesting more backing-track-jam-time. If you can direct some jam buddies to start playing 12-bar blues or 16-bar blues in A-minor, then you can jam for 4-5 hours nonstop. It is so fun the time passes like a blink of an eye.

      I dunno, unless you find good jam mates, it’s almost better to skip that whole show. Loading up lots of gear, driving ~1 hr to someone’s place, unloading and hooking up gear for half hour, to play only a couple hours, then to have their effort shift to drinking beers & eating chips and talking gossip for a couple hours, then breaking gear down and having to drive ~1 hr back, a full day of effort, for only a couple hours playing, meh… Yeah it’s tons of fun but it’s like meeting up with a motorcycle group who only ends up riding an hour out of the 8 hour day.

      I guess even Blackmore has this problem, which is why he’s solo now 😀 or duo in fact, with his wife, can’t beat that.

      I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! ♯ ♮ ♭ ø ° Δ ♩ ♪ ♫ ♬
      And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

    • #38002
      superblonde
      Keymaster

      “Barre and Power Chord Mayhem”

      Check out this free lesson from Dee J Nelson if you’d like to absolutely punish your downpicking right hand. I love this song and lesson.


      Skate Or Die – Punk Guitar Demo

      Problem is I can only play it at 70% of the 170 BPM tempo cleanly after all this time! doh! Still rockin though. By that I mean the rhythm part. Someday…. I will try getting the lead up to some speed. By addictively practicing it, my power chords did get a significant chunk faster. Talk about mayhem, this is it, imho. A good representation of Dee J’s other stuff too though this track is really fast tempo. Try it out.

      I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! ♯ ♮ ♭ ø ° Δ ♩ ♪ ♫ ♬
      And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

    • #38003
      vinay
      Participant

      I do agree that even though all MM rhythm guitar instructors do acknowledge that the lower range is essential for metal ever since the 90’s, they typically suggest using six string guitars and digital equipment to modify the sound. Which is a shame indeed. For those strictly looking at guitar tab though, they can probably get away imagining that 6th string as if it is the 7th and play it like that on their seven string guitar in standard tuning. You can even transpose it in Guitar Pro so you’ll get the modified tab with matching score and you can play along with it. You just can’t play along with the supplied recording and/or video though there are probably digital tool to change that too. If so, it would make your instructor sound a bit more bassy too ;). Courses where the full fretboard is being covered require a bit more work and knowledge. In case of Easy Guitar Modes, it isn’t even that hard to extend it further down. I feel it even makes more sense like that because you’re getting more of those full octave blocks out of them. The more classic courses which focus on five six string blocks may be harder to modify, especially for a beginner. Then again I feel something like Easy Guitar Modes (and possibly the new Dan Mumm course, haven’t looked into that yet) with fewer strings at a time make more sense than the classic approach anyway.

      So yeah, MM courses are doable on seven string guitars (eight string guitars probably too, haven’t tried that) but it takes a bit more work from the student end to use them (and your seven or eight string instrument) to their full potential.

    • #38006
      Shroud1969
      Participant

      @superblonde

      Thanks for the vid – it’s awesome – I love punk. Reminds me how everyone says “Blitzkrieg Bop” is to play. I’m like alternating strums sure – not hard at all. But have you every seen Johnny Ramone playing that at something near 200 BPM – full barre chords – all downstrums?! All downstrums! That’s a whole different animal, and the Ramones secret sauce.



      @vinay

      The reason I brought up 7+ strings is I have my eyeball on a Schecter Banshee Elite 7…might be kinda fun.

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Shroud1969.
    • #38016
      vinay
      Participant

      If you ever feel the need to dive (way) below the standard E then that’s where it comes handy. If D is all you need a standard six string probably suffices. I like to approach the root not from above and below. In typical thrash metal they play in E and either only approach it from above, or they use the whammy bar to dive below the E. The seventh string is nice to have a bit more freedom. If you only want it for more chugga chugga, yeah it does that too ;). But just like it eventually becomes interesting to tone down the gain and dial in some mid range, away from your full gain full scooped setup. Just like that, it is nice to expand the standard six string MM courses for the seven string guitar. I think Easy Guitar Modes makes for a nice candidate. That said, I wouldn’t be surprised if MM eventually releases seven (and possibly eight) string guitar courses to keep it interesting for the more modern metal guitar students.

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