Home Forums Other Topics Might try classical… maybe?

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    • #31097
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      I posted this question in 2hands classical thread but since that thread is for EXPLORING classical guitar music I thought I’d stop threadjack and put it here.

      I’m mostly hoping 2hand will respond but anyone who knows anything would be great. If someone wanted to test the waters, try out classical without diving in feet first just to see if it’s fun… what’s the best way to get started? I’m already a decent fingerpicker.

    • #31098
      MotleyCrue81
      Participant

      You will have to learn sheet. xD Get a good book, one that has a CD for soundtracks to go with it. It’s either a book or an instructor. I was in the classical guitar ensemble for my college, loved it. Loved it even though I got a metal soul heh. It will kind of open you up to an entirely different side of the guitar. Good stuff to know.

      Bring hair metal back!

    • #31103
      2handband
      Participant

      Big question. Okay…

      First, you’ll have a better experience overall with a nylon string instrument. They’re much easier to play this kind of music on, and offer a lot more on-demand timbrel variety. But if you don’t have one and just want to give this a shot just start on whatever you have. I got most of the way through Frederick Noad’s first book (which is a large tome that gets one well into intermediate territory) on a steel string acoustic. You’ll sometimes see non-classical fingerpickers throwing a few medium-difficulty classical pieces into their sets (including myself back in the day); Chet Atkins used to do it on an electric guitar! So I’ll tell you what I think is optimal, but don’t let anyone tell you that there is only one right way to do things. With one exception:

      Take the positioning and technique seriously. The worst advice beginning guitar students get is to hold the guitar in whatever position is most comfortable. Just because it’s the most comfortable thing to a noob doesn’t mean it places the hands in an optimal position, and you don’t even want to think about trying all of the weird chord grabs and long stretches CG involves with the neck of your guitar horizontal to the floor. That said, I’d avoid the footstool. Bad for your back. Lap supports are widely available, but I don’t do that either. I use a strap, and to hell with the purists. Since you already fingerpick, one bad habit you might have to unlearn is anchoring your pinky on the face of the guitar. No matter how much it slows you down at first, don’t do it! It stiffens up the whole hand. Lots of very good steel-string pickers do it that way, but they by and large do not have to execute the blindingly fast arpeggios and other such you’ll find in advanced classical repertoire. I was very lucky that I never got in that habit before I attempted CG; I always fingerpicked with a floating right hand.

      Also: I use my nails, but don’t let anyone tell you that you have to.

      Since you’re just testing the waters I doubt like hell you want to go to the expense of a live teacher. There are a lot of books out there, some better than others. Avoid like the plague anything with tab in it; if you can’t read notation you’re closing yourself off from an enormous percentage of the repertoire. Most of it never has been and never will be published in a tab edition. You play piano so I’m sure you already read, but reading for guitar takes practice, too. The best self-instruction book I know of is Frederick Noad’s venerable yet still superb Solo Guitar Playing. The 4th Edition is only like $16 on Amazon; a real bargain considering size and scope. I know books that only cover what are in the first few chapters of SGP but cost the same or higher. It’s got the most thorough set of sight-reading exercises of any beginner’s book I know of, and goes well into intermediate regions (it’s thick; 254 pages). A decided added benefit is the quantity and quality of the music contained within. Most beginner CG methods contain far too many very boring solo pieces in the early stages (it’s damn hard to write solo music for beginning guitar that isn’t lame), and then once you hit level two or so gives you a small handful along with the advice to consult your teacher for more. Noad comes at the problem with an awareness that good music will keep a student interested, that a large percentage of students will be using the book sans teacher, and that many of them will be largely ignorant of the repertoire and incapable of seeking out high-quality, level-appropriate music without assistance. Aside from being an educator Noad was also a respected musicologist with a vast knowledge of the repertoire and exquisite taste. He presents a relative few well-chosen pieces in the early chapters, and then starts finishing out every third or fourth chapter with a largish quantity of them (nine pieces at the end of Ch 22!). The music is level-appropriate, provides practice with the points of style, technique, and sight reading that have been recently covered, presents a wide overview of styles, eras, and composers, and best of all every piece is a gem. There was enough music in the 3rd edition book I learned from to qualify it not only as a method but an anthology, and now there is the 4th edition. This edition was put together by one of Noad’s students posthumously. It corrects some errors from the 3rd edition but leaves it otherwise untouched, except at the end it adds ten more pieces chosen from Noad’s four-volume anthology series that pretty much match up with the level you finish the book at.

      Ok, that got longwinded but in summary: get SGP. To get instruction up to the same level plus that much good music anywhere else you’ll probably be buying three or four separate method levels and at least one anthlogy… each of which will probably cost what this one book does. And it still won’t be as thorough. Here it is on Amazon:

      I see there’s now a Kindle edition for less $$$, but for this sort of thing I much prefer hardcopy. Don’t get the one with the CD; the temptation to learn by ear instead of developing your reading can be too great. I did this before youtube was a thing and literally learned what CG sounded like by learning the pieces in the 3rd edition book… and I’m damn glad it happened that way.

      All you really will need to get started should you choose to embark upon this journey is your copy of SGP, but a couple of other things might be helpful. For one thing SGP does a marvelous job of introducing the student to a broad cross-section of composers and repertoire Renaissance through Romantic, but is utterly lacking in anything post 19th century. This is not because Noad would not have liked to, but all of that music was under copyright (and much of it still is) and he and his publishers weren’t interested in dealing with nuisances like licensing and royalties. In the late 90s he’d announced plans to post a list of suggested post-romantic repertoire on his website, but died before it could be done. Trying to find a nice collection of student pieces representing modern composers and styles in one place is difficult, but if you get started and decide you want it let me know and I will suggest some stuff.

      Also, like all CG method authors Noad doesn’t cover theory at all. One Jeffery McFadden came to deplore what he saw as a huge gap in the abilities of the modern classical guitar player in that they could play the notes on the page well, but thrown into a random situation with other musicians they had little fluency when it came to just making music. Certainly this was not the historical state of affairs; I have the modern English-translated edition of Aguado’s superb 1843 method and it has a whole section on improvisation. McFadden’s 2010 doctoral thesis was a textbook entitled Fretboard Harmony For University Study. It is by no means comprehensive; Mcfadden himself said that if widespread adoption occurred (it hasn’t, although some universities are now using it) he would probably write a volume II which delved more deeply into modalism and other such concepts. The thesis itself features a relatively lengthy introductory section before getting to the actual method; it’s a thesis so he has to explain and justify everything. The book minus the introductory crap is available commercially but it is damn expensive. Fortunately you don’t have to buy it; the University of Toronto keeps all doctoral theses in a freely accessible online archive. If you get seriously into CG I encourage you to buy the book, hopefully sales will encourage Mcfadden to expand his excellent work and write that second volume. The free thesis:

      https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/24825/1/McFadden_Jeffrey_J_201003_DMA_thesis.pdf

      The commercial book:

      https://www.stringsbymail.com/fretboard-harmony-common-practice-harmony-on-the-guitar-9650.html

      You can reasonably start the book once you’re completely comfortable reading notes on the first four frets of the guitar… that means you’ll have completed chapter 8 in SGP.

      Get SGP. Download Fretboard Harmony. I’ll happily answer questions. If you’re interested in supplementary repertoire or want help developing a long-term plan just ask in this thread.

    • #31104
      2handband
      Participant

      You will have to learn sheet. xD Get a good book, one that has a CD for soundtracks to go with it. It’s either a book or an instructor. I was in the classical guitar ensemble for my college, loved it. Loved it even though I got a metal soul heh. It will kind of open you up to an entirely different side of the guitar. Good stuff to know.

      Dude, I did NOT know you were also a classical player. Got a favorite composer? I’m a disciple of Coste…

    • #31106
      Sarah Spisak
      Keymaster

      I was going to recommend Noad’s book but Gene beat me to it! I took a semester of classical guitar in college and this book was great. 🙂

    • #31107
      2handband
      Participant

      I was going to recommend Noad’s book but Gene beat me to it! I took a semester of classical guitar in college and this book was great.

      Well, hell… people with CG experience are popping out of the wordwork. Who’s your favorite composer, Sarah?

    • #31109
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Holy thorough answers, Gene! Much more than i expected. But that’s two votes for Solo Guitar Playing… sold! I just ordered a copy. I didn’t entirely take your advice… I got the one with the CD. But I’m going to make it a pint to learn something BEFORE I listen to it, because you’re right about the problem. It took me a lot of extra time to become a good reader for piano because I was listening to my teacher play the examples and figuring them out by ear. I’m still slower than I should be. I also downloaded that thesis.

      As it happens I recently came into possession of a nylon string guitar. I think it’s a pretty cheap one but I’ll start with it. I might need to get it looked at cus the action is kind of on the high side. Not unplayable, but higher than I’m used to for sure.

      I don’t know where it’ll lead. I might find it boring but if I can give it a good try for the cost of a book and maybe a setup then what do I have to lose? I’ve been enjoying the music posted in the classical guitar thread. I’ve always liked listening to classical music but I hadn’t heard the guitar stuff before, at least not to notice it.

    • #31111
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      So I just tried playing fingerstyle without planting my pinky on the top… yeah. That’s gonna not be a fun habit to break. But I’m committed now that I ordered the book! I know how my own brain works. Once I’ve laid down the money I’m going to have to give it an honest try. That’s how I majored in chemistry for almost arbitrary reasons and ended up in grad school!

    • #31112
      2handband
      Participant

      Take your guitar to a place that actually deals in classical guitars, because there’s a good chance nothing is wrong with your action but your local rock guitar emporium won’t know that. One of the most immediately noticeable differences between a classical and a flamenco guitar is the action. Flamenco players have certain techniques like rhythmically popping the strings against the fretboard that don’t work well unless the action is quite low, but utter clarity of tone is highly prized in classical circles. Even a little bit of buzzing is considered completely unacceptable no matter how heavily you’re playing, so classical guitar action tends to be a bit on the highish side. Certainly take it in and make sure you don’t have a problem, but take it somewhere that they know what they’re talking about.

      As for the pinky on top, I wouldn’t stress about it this second. My advice: once you get your book in the mail, absolutely DO NOT play any kind of fingerstyle for awhile. Just work out of the book, which starts you on square one with single-note exercises. Take a beginner’s mindset while you’re re-learning your technique for plucking the strings with your fingers and you’ll save yourself tons of time. You’ll go much faster than a complete beginner because your fingers already know how to pluck the strings, they just need to learn to do it without the hand anchor. It won’t take long if you do it this way.

    • #31113
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Ok. I was monkeying with the guitar this morning and it’s not hard to play as it is, just takes some getting used to. There is a specialty high end acoustic dealer near where I live and I think they do classical stuff. I’ll get them to look.

      As for a long term plan… I don’t even have a short term one yet! Except to work through some of the Noad method and see if it’s for me. I don’t even know what a long term plan would look like!

    • #31114
      2handband
      Participant

      Measure your action at the 12th fret on both bass and treble side in mm and post it here please.

    • #31115
      Sarah Spisak
      Keymaster

      Who’s your favorite composer, Sarah?

      Well, J.S. Bach comes to mind! 🙂

    • #31118
      slash
      Participant

      back in the day I bought a book to help learn classical finger style. I think it was called CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR THE ROCK GUITARIST. I probably still have it somewhere.

      "The blues ain't nothin' but a good man feelin' bad" - Willie Brown
      Tip #4 Learn to Play by EAR!

    • #31120
      Sarah Spisak
      Keymaster

      back in the day I bought a book to help learn classical finger style. I think it was called CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR THE ROCK GUITARIST. I probably still have it somewhere.

      Or you could just learn “Dee” by Randy Rhoads. LOL

      • #31122
        slash
        Participant

        yep, did that back in the day too 😉

        "The blues ain't nothin' but a good man feelin' bad" - Willie Brown
        Tip #4 Learn to Play by EAR!

    • #31123
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      4.6mm on the bass side, about 3.9 on the treble. Ha, I forgot about Dee!

    • #31124
      2handband
      Participant

      Well, J.S. Bach comes to mind!

      Ok, I was thinking guitar composers but fair enough! Bach transcription for guitar have been a tradition ever since Segovia started doing it. Personally I avoid transcriptions like the bloody plague… there is too much great music actually written for the instrument that rarely gets played.

      back in the day I bought a book to help learn classical finger style. I think it was called CLASSICAL GUITAR FOR THE ROCK GUITARIST. I probably still have it somewhere.

      One of Ben Bolt’s earlier books… I have a copy lying around somewhere. He’s popular because he transcribes guitar versions of non-guitar music by famous composers, and because he releases editions of the better known (and relatively easy) classical guitar literature in tab. I have two of his beginning classical methods including that one, and if we’re being honest I’m not crazy about either of them.

      4.6mm on the bass side, about 3.9 on the treble. Ha, I forgot about Dee!

      That’s a bit on the high side. 4mm on the bass and 3mm on the treble is closer to what you want. If you don’t feel comfortable filing your bridge down take it in and have it done professionally.

    • #31128
      2handband
      Participant

      As for a long term plan… I don’t even have a short term one yet! Except to work through some of the Noad method and see if it’s for me. I don’t even know what a long term plan would look like!

      A short-term plan:

      1) Work on material from SGP. Once you start coming across the exercises for daily practice you can start using them as a 10-15 minute warm-up. Classical is hard; the temptation to spend all your time working on pieces and none on technique should be resisted at all costs so the exercises are your friend. They need not be cumulative; once you start working the arpeggio exercises (for example) in the later chapters you can drop the earlier ones.

      2) Start building a repertoire out of the easy solos in SGP, starting with the Spanish Study at the end of Chapter 7. Memorize every solo piece! At this early juncture every bit of repertoire you have is precious. Once you start getting better and can approach more interesting material you can start deciding what to drop, but wait till you have at least a solid hour’s worth of material. Most pro recitalists will tell you… and I agree… that two hours of memorized repertoire is about the reasonable limit to try and maintain. If you’re going to keep learning new things, there’s going to be some rollover.

      3) Supplement the music in SGP with some examples of 20th and 21st century repertoire. I’d start seriously thinking about doing so no later than the time you start working on chapter fifteen. You don’t need to go hogwild, but picking up one contemporary piece for every chapter of SGP you go through starting with fifteen would not be a bad goal.

      4) Study Jeffery McFadden’s fretboard harmony text. A good time to start with that is when you start working on sight-reading in the higher positions; around chapter 13 in SGP. Do all of the exercises, no matter how trite sounding. The happy end result of going through this process is that the classical guitarist comes out the other side able to ease into almost any musical situation, while still maintaining his/her identity as a classical guitarist.

      That’s a good short-term plan. A longer term plan would have to be tailored more to the student’s specific likes and dislikes. I came out the other side of SGP pretty infatuated with 19th century guitar music, so a lot of my course of study since then has been centered around that. Either way 19th century studies should be in any guitarist’s post-SGP diet, because that’s where all of the best intermediate etudes seem to have come from. One thing I DO recommend is that regardless of direction you pick up SGP Volume 2 once you have completed Volume 1. It’s not like a next-level path to virtuosity book; more of a guide to refining your sight-reading and learning more about ornaments and period interpretation. Like Volume 1, it’s chock-full of music that is an absolute pleasure to play.

    • #31133
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Aside from technique I see you’re placing a big emphasis on learning the styles and eras. I suppose that makes sense. Clarification: you said more advanced study has to be tailored more. Do professional classical guitarists specialize in different eras or whatever?

    • #31134
      2handband
      Participant

      Aside from technique I see you’re placing a big emphasis on learning the styles and eras. I suppose that makes sense. Clarification: you said more advanced study has to be tailored more. Do professional classical guitarists specialize in different eras or whatever?

      Well… rarely. Certainly if you’re going to test for the grades you’ll be expected to perform several pieces representing different eras and demonstrate your command of the idiomatic interpretation and ornamentation (for the record I think the tests and grades are retarded). You have to be able to play anything thrown at you in a convincing way. But at the same time, a more advanced player should be focusing largely on the music that makes him or her happy, and making sure to get enough other stuff in to keep the necessary skills intact.

      Tomorrow morning when I’m a little less rushed I’ll post a loose sample of what a good intermediate regimen for SGP graduates might look like. Granted you’re probably at least two years away from that assuming you even decide you like it enough to continue, but it’ll give you an idea of where this is all headed. I find that if you’re laying out a course of self-study it’s best to plan ahead.

    • #31135
      Kenny Almendral
      Participant

      I love nylon strings 🙂

    • #31142
      MotleyCrue81
      Participant

      I wouldn’t quite consider myself a classical guitarist, I do have a soft spot for it though. I would say I more or less just took an opportunity to play some guitar at school heh. I know enough technique to get by as mediocre, but I definitely still need to delve deeper into it because it is an interesting world of pretty stuff to play.

      Bring hair metal back!

    • #31146
      2handband
      Participant

      I wouldn’t quite consider myself a classical guitarist, I do have a soft spot for it though. I would say I more or less just took an opportunity to play some guitar at school heh. I know enough technique to get by as mediocre, but I definitely still need to delve deeper into it because it is an interesting world of pretty stuff to play.

      I did the opposite in school. I was a composition major, not a performance major, and I was gigging more or less full time so I considered the mandatory performing group credits requirement to be a nuisance. I could have played guitar in one of several ensembles to get those credits, but I determined that men’s choir would be less time consuming. I didn’t play a note of guitar in the music building, ever. 😉

    • #31147
      2handband
      Participant

      As promised, here is an idea of how I would lay things out for post-SGP study. This is assuming a student isn’t dogmatically attached to any one era or group of composers (i.e. a perfect world scenario).

      1) SGP Volume 2. An important note here is that when I teach a student in the beginning through early intermediate phases SGP is the primary focus, with some supplementary repertoire thrown in and theory study from McFadden’s book (augmented by some theory stuff by me). Once we hit Volume 2 SGP becomes an absolute maximum of 50% of a student’s diet.

      2) Studies and etudes by guitar composers. The emphasis here is heavily 19th century, simply because that’s where the bulk of your intermediate studies seem to come from. These etudes are generally short pieces that eat at most two pages and take no more than two or three minutes to play. Three composers in particular wrote killer sets of beginning to intermediate studies: Fernando Sor, Mauro Giuliani, and Matteo Carcassi. I generally have students just pick up a copy of Frederick Noad’s 100 Graded Classical Guitar Studies, which consists of selections only those three composers, and work through all of them. From more modern composers I favor study collections by Leo Brouwer, Steven Dodgson, and Reginald Smith Brindle.

      3) Exercises. Generally ones tailored to trouble spots in whatever etudes one is working on at the moment. I pull them mostly out of Hubert Kappel’s Bible of Guitar Technique, but there are several other very good exercise books too.

      By the time you get through all that you’re ready to tackle some major concert works, but there’s still a long way to go and there are a lot of advanced study collections out there. You can still get a lot more out of Sor and Giuliani; Sor Op. 6 and Giuliani Op. 48 in particular are excellent advanced collections. Some of the stuff in the more modern Dodgson and Brouwer books too is pretty advanced. From the 19th century Legnani’s 36 Caprices is my all-time favorite advanced study collection (there are still a few in there I struggle with), and the studies at the end of Aguado’s two methods should not be overlooked. Coste and Metz have some really good ones as well. Two modern collections an advanced student simply must pick up: 12 Etudes by Heitor Villa-Lobos and the Barrios complete studies.

    • #31160
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Thanks, Gene! I copied and pasted all of that to a document for future reference.

      I got my book in the mail yesterday… gotta love Amazon Prime! Spent some time on the first couple chapters worth of exercises. It’s pretty easy for me right now because I already understand the notation, and because I’m used to picking with my fingers. The floating right hand isn’t really causing me any problems for this single-note stuff, so hopefully I can make the transition to more complicated things without my head exploding.

      I’m using a pillow on my left leg to elevate the neck right now, and I’m going to pick up one of those supports today. I called that acoustic guitar dealer and they DO carry lots if high end classical guitars and do repairs on them. They said if it’s just a bridge thing they can take care of it while I’m there, and they also sell the guitar supports. So I’m gojng down there this afternoon to get the guitar set up and get one.

      It’s kinda fun so far, but i have a question. What’s up with this rest strokes thing? I’m not sold that I hear a difference, and it’s harder to do.

    • #31165
      2handband
      Participant

      Shit, wish I’d seen that question earlier. It’s late enough in the day that you’ve probably already been and gone to that dealership, and my best advice is to go there and compare rest and free stroke on a GOOD classical guitar. You said yours is a cheapy, which probably means a stiff, non-resonant top. And the difference is all in how the string sets the top in motion.

      When you do a rest stroke you are pressing the string down as you pick, and setting it into a plane of motion that goes up and down in relation to the face of the guitar, and up and down is the way the top moves… not side to side. So the energy of the string vibration is used much more efficiently and you get a nice, warm, round tone. A free stroke, especially in the hands of a novice, sets the string in motion parallel to the top of the guitar. In effect it’s trying to pull the top side to side, and the top does not move that way. The result is not a BAD sound, but it’s lighter, airier, and less full.

      Obviously just due to the mechanics of playing solo guitar you will play more free strokes than rest strokes, but rest strokes are often used for emphasis or to bring a melody line out. Listen to Segovia play… all those thick, round high notes are rest strokes. Segovia came out of the late 19th/early 20th century Spanish romantic school that said you had to lay the emotion on with a trowel, and he used rest strokes to an extent that’s almost considered bad taste today. Noad was one of the second generaton diciples of that school and you’ll find in his book advice to use rest stroke where it doesn’t really make sense… for instance to bring out the melody at the top of an arpeggio when doing so would deaden a chord tone that really ought to keep sounding. You can accent stuff without rest strokes, and with practice you can achieve a free stroke that sounds almost…almost… like a good rest stroke by working on angle of attack.

      Also: you’ll find the two to be indistinguishable or very close to it on a steel string guitar.

      If you get a chance try em both on an expensive classical. The difference will probably surprise you.

    • #31237
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Yeah, I saw your post after I got home. So I went back to the store yesterday and tried comparing the two strokes on a Ramirez that cost over $2000. You’re right… it was a big difference. So o guess I have to get over myself and learn rest strokes…

    • #31299
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Another question on rest strokes. As a practical matter, will I use them much on the lower strings with my thumb?

      One thing is for sure. After playing that one at the store my own guitar is like playing on an oak log. If this turns into a long term thing for me I’ll have to get better classical guitar.

    • #31300
      2handband
      Participant

      Another question on rest strokes. As a practical matter, will I use them much on the lower strings with my thumb?

      Sometimes. Particularly if the melody is in the bass. Once again, just by necessity most strokes are free strokes; you simply can’t always bring the plucking finger to rest on an adjacent string. And the early crop of classical guitarists in the 20th century used it in a lot of contexts where it compromised other parts of the music. Here’s where you have to get a sense of how much the classical guitar’s big surge of popularity in the years following WWII were the result of a cult of personality centered around one man. Segovia was the ultimate embodiment of Spanish romanticism, and if sacrificing the middle voice was what it took to wring the maximum amount of emotion out of that upper melody he wouldn’t count the cost for a single second. And for quite a long time, Segovia’s way was THE way and nobody was going to make a successful concert career without Segovia’s seal of approval.

      That’s the one thing to watch out for in Noad’s book, really. When you’re playing a high melody note simultaneously with a bass note he tells you to bring out the melody by using a rest stroke on the top voice and a free stroke with your thumb and that the bass note coming slightly ahead of the melody is an acceptable consequence this is a piece of advice to IGNORE! By all means use a rest stroke for that melody note if it doesn’t interfere with anything else but get the notes to sound simultaneously. It’s hard… when you do a rest stroke simultaneously with a free stroke thumb the natural tendency is for the bass note to happen first. In modern classical circles this is referred to as BNF (bass note first) and isn’t exactly contraindicated… but it has to be a choice. With the older crop of players it was just reflexive; one music journalist attending a Segovia concert asked the guitarist friend he went with in complete innocence if there was some reason it was impossible for a guitarist to play two notes simultaneously.

      You’ll also see a great deal about using a rest stroke to bring out the melody in an arpeggio. The example Noad uses for this is Sor’s very famous Bm study (Op 35 No 22) and for this study it works great because of where the melody notes fall. But later you get Carcassi’s Op 60 No 3 and he once again tells you to use a rest stroke for the melody note… which has the effect of killing the arpeggio note that you just played on the previous string and is clearly part of the harmony. Don’t sacrifice inner voices for the sake of rest stroke no matter what Noad has to say about it. That’s my only real problem with his method.

      Important note: I’m not really knocking Segovia. But he’s the one who used to call the guitar a miniature orchestra, and no orchestra conductor would butcher the middle voices the way he did. That said, I’ll take him any day over the sterile-sounding super-technicians that comprise a large percentage of the modern concert performers. Segovia had a style, and he was the best at it. The only issue I have is that he applied that style to music written wildly outside of it and to which it wasn’t really suited. But that’s still better than the modern way of thinking that a performer shouldn’t have a style, and be nothing but a conduit for the composer’s intentions.

      One thing is for sure. After playing that one at the store my own guitar is like playing on an oak log. If this turns into a long term thing for me I’ll have to get better classical guitar.

      I’m considering a ten-string:

      http://www.bartolexusa.com/SLS105295/SLS10HI.html

    • #31302
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Thanks for the tips. But oh my god, that guitar you just linked to… the width of that fretboard is intimidating! How low do one of those things go? Does it just keep going down in 4ths?

    • #31432
      2handband
      Participant

      Rachael: I’m going to modify my recommendation for an exercise book. I just picked up Kitharologus: The Path to Virtuosity. It’s much better than the one I recommended upthread. I wouldn’t worry about it till you get through SGP Volume 1, but something to keep in mind.

      Also: My daughter Maiya is working through SGP as well right now, so I’m busy going through anthologies and choosing some 20th and 21st century repertoire to supplement the music in Noad’s book for her. If you like I’ll hit you with those selections as I make them. I think it’s too much for self-taught beginner who is not familiar with the repertoire to choose level-appropriate pieces and insert them in the right places… it’s better to be led by the nose for awhile. If you decide to use the pieces I suggest you’ll have to pick up the books that contain them of course.

      EDIT: somehow missed seeing your question about the ten-string. I’ll answer later but the short version: no it does not keep going down in 4ths!

    • #31435
      crazyrach97
      Participant

      Hey, thanks Gene. I’m a little derailed on it right now but for a good reason: I just joined a band! Total top 40 cover band. So I’m learning all these songs right now and only have a couple of weeks to do it, and of course it would happen right when I’m in the final stages of tidying up my thesis. So I figure I’ll have to jump back on the classical once I’ve got these songs conquered. Still kind of curious about ten string tuning tho!

    • #38090
      Louismar3
      Participant

      I started with flamenco guitar and It was really difficult but it was worth it. I did this course in spanish with subtitles in english:

      Curso de guitarra flamenca de Jeronimo de Carmen

      If you don’t know anything yet I would start with something like this. The teacher of this course teach you the basic things as how to handle the guitar, which kind of movement should you learn first etc.

      Even if you prefer to play rock It is good to start with the basics things with the spanish guitar first.

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