HomeForumsOther Topics"Write 14 songs in 28 days" challenge

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  superblonde 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #20816

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Many years ago (2002?) some nutty writer got so fed up with writers block that he (or she?) created a self-competition blog to write an entire book in the month of November -or else-.. it became this big worldwide internet blogger thing called nanowrimo that has been going globally for years now ( http://nanowrimo.org ) and lots of writers finally had to confront the ridiculousness of the superstition called ‘writers block’ and also many have kind of turned it into a business on it’s own.. The really amazing thing about nanowrimo is that I believe it forced the writing community to take a hard look at that writers block problem and why the instructional materials for writing kind of reenforce the myth (or certainly offer few good solutions).

    I forgot but there’s a newer internet thing called February Album Writing Month FAWM “14 songs in 28 days- The goal is simple: pledge to write about one new song every other day for the shortest month of the year. Just because you can! Do what the pros do: show up and start making music.” I havent looked into http://fawm.org but this post is a reminder to myself.. Not a bad goal right, a self-challenge to write a song every other day for a month. After the 1 month, there will be a lot of junk plus maybe one or two interesting things. Probably, hopefully, there will be a similar weeding out of the old myths about songwriting to improve instruction and songwriters’ skill.

    Edit. The Guitar Center Singer/Songwriter contest is finalizing now, I didnt check the entrants this year but previous years were just.. ugh, many of the songs did not even feature guitars. (How can it be a guitar center contest and not feature guitar parts?!)

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #20818

    MattKnox
    Participant

    So I have heard of this before.  I believe it was from speed song writing or something like that.  There are a couple ways to look at this.  First is the definition of songwriting to you.  Like you I know guitar center is singer songwriter and that is cool.  Most people forget that songwriting can be the old 3 chords and a smile theme.  Put some lyrics to it.  They don’t have to be perfect, but you have the start to a great song and can go back and fix it later.  Then there is just riff writing, that can turn into songs later.  It goes on and on.  The final is complete full songs.  Again they don’t have to be perfect, just listen to Dimebag Darrell’s “Whiskey Road”.  Not perfect, but hey it’s dimebag and he is the man!  I really want to write an album this year, and you reminding me of this is great because I am terrible at lyric writing so it would be great to practice.

  • #20819

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Yep! It depends I think on skills level, these might be complete songs as well, all song parts plus solos and intros and outros. Take Melodic Principles and Riffology for example, those are totally fertile ground for making riffs. And Doug’s Classic Licks and Dee J’s Lead Guitar DNA is perfect for creating full length solos, I used to really break pencils trying to write a solo that made any kind of sense and basically not have any clue, it is much easier (not easy but much easier) after going thru Classic Licks for hours and hours previously and the basic course modes stuff again. So in a way I think it is selling the idea short to consider that these rapidly written songs are cowboy chords and campfire lyrics. I think some of them can be full blown songs, one thing these challenges tend to do, is that you have to prepare up front or the challenge is lost already, i.e. it quickly becomes apparent when it takes a week just to create a basic drum track first just to start a single song, “duh I should have started with some basic template full length drum tracks”, that kind of stuff. It really forces the work flow to be optimized for full speed. I guess it’s easier to see from the novel-writing-challenge side because everyone is forced to write essays since grade school, everyone knows what the basic template process is for writing, like: make a document that has name in the upper right, date in the upper left, page numbers in the footer, etc. Making templates for songwriting should be somewhat similar.. still unique to the songwriter but I mean like: Reaper project template, GP6 project template, backing tracks ready, other files lined up, etc.

    Supposedly from Ozzy’s autobio, Sabbath finished the first album but had studio time left and were forced to write Paranoid as album filler, starting from nothing and finishing within 2 hours to the final recording or something like that. I’m guessing that is slightly exaggerated but still seems amazing and shows what might be possible when ‘in the zone’.

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

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