HomeForumsOther Topicsthe rhythm of your leads

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  rightonthemark 2 weeks, 6 days ago.

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  • #22231

    rightonthemark
    Participant

    a while back this topic came up. i tried to find the thread but couldn’t.
    in his prasing lesson paul gilbert talks about rhythm.
    then he does something amazing.
    he uses the exact rhythm of the exact song i had used as an example for adding rhythmic patterns to your lead playing.
    good lesson to help you take your knowledge of scales and patterns and put some rhythm to it. \m/

    rock and roll ain't pretty; that's why they picked us to play it.

  • #22233

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Geez. He does the whole lesson with crazy random syncopated beat suggestions, all while tapping is foot perfectly consistently in quarter note time. Gilbert is an alien. I’m gonna go cry now. lol

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

    • #22234

      rightonthemark
      Participant

      yeah paul gilbert is great.
      i love this video of him doing snortin whiskey.
      just having the greatest time jammin.

      rock and roll ain't pretty; that's why they picked us to play it.

  • #22235

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    wow. what a monster song. Its a good example too because he switches up the rhythm several times even though it’s standard blues rock, he keeps the song interesting.
    Gilbert’s point in his lesson seems like a common problem, how to remember or recall different rhythms, to apply to licks for making phrases. Drummers must have some trick to this for remembering drum rhythms when starting songs, I wonder what they do. I’ve seen drummers in cover bands kind of scratching their heads or psyching themselves up in a setlist trying to recall how a particular drum groove goes, in order to start the next song properly, like “how’s it go, is it, ta da ta ta, or is it, ta boom ta ta… ooh okay I got it..” stuff like that.

    I still end up falling to the trap of continual-quarter-note-solos. At some point I will just have to really focus on this, beyond just doing a specific exercise here or there. One suggestion that helped is one of the previous threads on this topic, the idea about following a speech pattern during a blues solo. Imitate the pattern of the blues lyrics in the solo (i.e. take the cliche vocal pattern “so–, I wo—ke up this morn–ing”, that same rhythmic pattern can be applied in an improv lick).

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

    • #22236

      rightonthemark
      Participant

      yeah the vocal line is a great way to expand lead guitar ideas.

      i’m guessing your 1/4 note thing is pretty much all on beat?
      try doing off beat notes – playing on the “and.” i typically do that with up strokes.

      i struggle sometimes with learning licks. especially licks not in the context of a song. just notes in a pattern. i tend to view them as skeletons or patterns kind of like sequences in a scale run that i can do in any rhtyhm depending on the feel of the song.
      but i do practice changing up rhythms when i’m just noodling around.
      so when i play solos in cover songs i usually get most of the notes correct or at least in the right scale shape/pattern but the individual licks will be my interpretation based solely on the moment. it’s kind of an improvisation but with a skeleton or outline of where to play on the neck and the scale shapes/patterns to use. and sometimes even lick patterns. if that makes any sense.
      but it did take me a while to learn to play off beat accents.
      and using the rhythm guitar rhythms as rhythmic patterns for lead guitar is very helpful too.

      \m/

      rock and roll ain't pretty; that's why they picked us to play it.

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