HomeForumsGuitar InstructorsGuitar Lesson Questions

This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Sarah Spisak 6 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #21751

    Montanaman80
    Participant

    Hi everyone. My name is Michael Barnhart and I have some guitar questions for you:

    What are chord “voicings”?

    What does a guitar capo do to the fret-board of a guitar?

    Are open position guitar chords “moveable” by that I mean by using your index finger as a bar for the chord?

    What is “E-D-C-A-G”?

    How do guitar chords get their “shapes”?

    Are power chords major or minor?

    How do I listen better when playing?

    How do I hear music in my “brain” as to what note or chord comes next?

    How do I make playing scales more “musical” rather than a finger exercise?

    How do I train my ears to hear and understand music on a higher level?

    This is all of the questions I have for now. I will be back. Please e-mail me at michael.barnhart74@yahoo.com.

    Thanks for all of your help.

  • #21752

    grondak
    Participant

    Hi Michael,

    I wrote you a long answer on one of your questions.  Then I looked at some of your others.  Reading some of your other questions, I’d try on the Complete Basic Course. It’s recently revised and I bet you’ll get quite a kick out of it.

     

    Here is my long answer anyway:

    You have come to the right place for all of those answers! Let’s start by listening better when playing and training your ears to hear and understand on a higher level.  I’m working on that now, and I personally think the answers are related.

    The easiest way is to begin interval training. You can do that with your guitar, by playing some intervals and listening closely.  Of course, intervals are the guts of scales. I bet you already know some scales. You can play the intervals inside a scale to learn what they sound like. Example: The minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, major third intervals are all easy to play on one string. Don’t forget the unison interval 🙂

    You can expand that to working on learning lots of scales (including modes.)  I do lots of listening and playing to work on this.  Sarah, one of the instructors here, has explained to me (like 47 times, lol) that if I know the scale of the song I’m learning (or of the passage in the song… some vary throughout the song) that it makes it easier to play the song.  She’s right.  I try hard to pick up the scale for the song.

    I work with Sarah via Skype lessons twice a week. I’m improving steadily through practice and guidance on my journey.  She’s got a lesson set on here, “Melodic Principles” that will really help with these two questions.

    Metal Method is helping me across the board!

  • #21753

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    How do I hear music in my “brain” as to what note or chord comes next?

    I have the answer to that one now. Play the same 8 note scale every day for a couple months (at different positions) and listen to the notes while playing. Tada! The notes will be so embedded in your head that you can hum the next note when given any other note. Since the chords are based on the notes in the scale (root note) then it also means you know what chord comes next.

    If it sounds like a lot of work it is really not. It’s at around week 30 of the basic course which means, starting at week 1, you’d get there within a few months time.

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21765

    Sarah Spisak
    Keymaster

    Are power chords major or minor?

    They have no third and are neither major nor minor.

    How do I listen better when playing? How do I train my ears to hear and understand music on a higher level? 

    I strongly recommend listening to music at slow speed!  You can use many different kinds of software to do this.

    How do I make playing scales more “musical” rather than a finger exercise?

    Practice over backing tracks!

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