HomeForumsEquipmentFret Leveling Beams? LONG ones

This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  safetyblitz 6 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #21730

    pipelineaudio
    Participant

    Anyone know a cheaper source for something like this? I’d really like a 20″, the 16″ is a bit short for me, I have one, and the 24″ a bit long, though I’d like a 24″ as well later

    http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Tools_for_Sanding/Fret_Fingerboard_Levelers.html

  • #21731

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    I thought the alternative was plate glass. Ouch, sharp. How expensive for a couple pieces of precisely cut plate glass?

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21732

    pipelineaudio
    Participant

    Not a bad idea!

  • #21736

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    Anyone know a cheaper source for something like this? I’d really like a 20″, the 16″ is a bit short for me, I have one, and the 24″ a bit long, though I’d like a 24″ as well later http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Tools_for_Sanding/Fret_Fingerboard_Levelers.html

    I don’t know if a regular carpentry supply place might have an equivalent? I like the idea of using a metal I-beam or box-beam level from Wal-Mart or equivalent, but you’d need to use a straightedge or a taut string to check it for straightness.

  • #21744

    MotleyCrue81
    Participant

    You could always get the 24″ and chop it if you have a good saw.  🙂

    Bring hair metal back!

  • #21750

    bdickens
    Participant

    My suggestion would be to just go ahead and bite the bullet. From my own experience in my professional life, I can tell you that using a high quality tool that is purpose-made for the task at hand makes the job so much easier. 

    For example I have a $400 Snap-On air hammer that makes quick work of jobs that took much longer with my previous one because it hits so much harder, yet with way more fine control and finesse. 

    Buy once, cry once.

    Byron Dickens

  • #21754

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Plus its a tax write off 😀

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21763

    bdickens
    Participant

    Unfortunately not.

    Byron Dickens

  • #21764

    pipelineaudio
    Participant

    Back home in arizona it would be peanuts to go downtown, get a boxed section of steel and then pay 15 dollars to have it cut then precision ground to perfect, but here in Hawaii, yeah, hard to shape steel with coconuts

    • #21775

      superblonde
      Keymaster

      Typical “I’m stuck on an tropical island” response: use bamboo. ;-D

      I was going to suggest 3D printing but I dont think it’s precise enough. But you could try contacting some local maker group and tell them the tolerance you require, see if they have anything.

      LOL that video is funny 04:30 “i learned this from crimson guitars, i’ve got time for his knowledge but not for the bloke, he’s dingus.” Hah Tough crowd 😀

      I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
      And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21777

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    Typical “I’m stuck on an tropical island” response: use bamboo. ;-D I was going to suggest 3D printing but I dont think it’s precise enough. But you could try contacting some local maker group and tell them the tolerance you require, see if they have anything.

    I kind of like the suggestion in a related video of using a table-saw top as a reference, and taping sandpaper down onto that to grind something else flat. Of course, that assumes the table-saw is flat, and that you have a table-saw. Other suggestions people make are using a granite counter top or a polished concrete floor as a reference. Not ideal, but could work in a pinch. The lack of precise uniformity in controlling how many passes you make over each section of fret top probably means you can’t take full advantage of an ultra-flat leveling beam anyway. But there is a point of diminishing returns when DIY resources aren’t readily available. Don’t they have a saying in Hawaii about “paradise tax”?

  • #21779

    pipelineaudio
    Participant

    The point of having the right size beam is that you can have ALL of the frets under the beam at all times, if you are doing the whole fretboard

  • #21781

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    The point of having the right size beam is that you can have ALL of the frets under the beam at all times, if you are doing the whole fretboard

    If this was in reply to my “lack of precise uniformity” comment, my point was that regardless of the length of your beam, you still won’t be hitting the entire extent of each fret top on each pass. That would requre a concave beam rather than a flat beam, and it would need to be wider than the fretboard (as is often used for sanding fixed radius fingerboards) and wouldn’t be suitable for working on compound radius necks.

    Another clarifying comment for my “table-saw top” post is that the guy wasn’t grinding the frets on the table-saw top, he was grinding one surface of a spirit level against sandpaper on the table-saw top so he could subsequently use the spirit level as a leveling beam.

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