HomeForumsMeet and GreetDo you consider guitars as investments?

This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Master Killer 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #21551

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Just wondering, it seems many guitar players consider guitars to be an investment (buy it, play it, sell it later perhaps for profit or money back). I think this changes a lot of how people might choose an instrument to play. How do you guys view your guitars? Personally I don’t consider resale value for gear, I just get what I think I need at the time, tho that’s probably because I’m lousy at selling/trading stuff.

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21553

    bdickens
    Participant

    To me, they are utilitarian.

     

     

    Byron Dickens

  • #21557

    Igglepud
    Participant

    They are not a financial investment for me.

    MY ROCK IS FIERCE!!!

  • #21559

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    Just wondering, it seems many guitar players consider guitars to be an investment (buy it, play it, sell it later perhaps for profit or money back). I think this changes a lot of how people might choose an instrument to play. How do you guys view your guitars? Personally I don’t consider resale value for gear, I just get what I think I need at the time, tho that’s probably because I’m lousy at selling/trading stuff.

    With very rare exceptions, guitars generally depreciate in value rather than appreciate.

    While the expected useful life of a guitar is generally longer than an automobile, I think there are a lot of parallels between the two markets.

    What I do see is people often buying guitars the same way they buy non-collectible automobiles: they consider how much of its value they might expect to recoup on the used market if they decide they want something else.

    And boutique guitars are probably like boutique autos: the price may fluctuate unpredictably based on the whim of the market at any given time, but it’s impossible to predict reliably which niche examples may become highly sought after in the future. Mere scarcity itself is no guarantee of future value.

  • #21560

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Well, my guitar series was discontinued yet has a following.. I see the price has appreciated on the sale sites, I paid $600 now I see it going for like $800-$850 or even more. But I always figured I would smash it someday, not re-sell it 😀

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21561

    MotleyCrue81
    Participant

    Depends on if it’s a top of the line guitar with certain characteristics that is no longer available. Also depends on if you get famous or not haha. Maybe my 1989 Epiphone G-300 will be worth something one day because it’s the only year with the headstock style and was made in one of the good Korea plants but I doubt it’ll be worth anything substantial. My RRXMG will probably only ever go down and my custom one will be worth a ton – to me haha.

    Bring hair metal back!

  • #22271

    Master Killer
    Participant

    I had a Fender Performer I bought for $400 bucks that I sold to a pawn shop for 300 bucks. it now sells on Ebay for upwards of $2500.

    The only other guitar I had that has held it’s value was a Pink Fender HM Strat. I bought it for $800 in 1991 and it pretty much sells for the same today but considering inflation and all I guess that’s nothing to write home about.

    Guitars are kind of like comic books. Precious few become gold mines and most are worth little to nothing over time.

    Cheap Guitars (with some exceptions) play just about as good as expensive ones. It's your ability combined with an awesome amp that makes the difference.

  • #22277

    DanzoStrife
    Participant

    Guitar market is very strange.

    Some reason I wasn’t able to obtain Jackson DK2m early this year when I needed a guitar, the price was around $600-750.
    But now they all dropped to $400 in Near mint.

    The price of Ibanez S540m’s are really high right now , $600 avg for a “very good” condition. Another guitar that I could’t obtain.
    In general, used Ibanez RG550s are very expensive, $700 etc but the newest RG655 PRESTIGE MIJ was shortly on the used market for $650-750 for a few of them as Mint. Why get a 20 yr old guitar with worn frets when u can get an identical style updated build made in the same high end factory?
    I really wanted an Ibanez but pricing is ridiculous and I’d only settle for MIJ
    Used ESP LTD M-1000’s are also going for only a little less than new price. (Similar non signature specs to my guitar, but totally unobtainable)

    Since my LTD JH-600 valued at $999 was at 425, that was really an instant buy. The price is back up to massive inflation, some selling new for $1500 on eBay, others selling for $650 to $800

    Seems lots of Jackson Randy Rhoads are dumped on the used market so there’s a lot of selection now

  • #22278

    PaulWolfe
    Participant

    To me, a guitar has always been an instrument to be played. The idea of buying a guitar with the intention of reselling it for profit just seems dumb. My first guitar was a 1966 Fender Mustang and cost me $210 (with a Fender Princeton Reverb amp). Now, because Kurt Cobain played a Mustang, they command large numbers… in 1980 nobody wanted a Mustang. I wish I still had it (and the amp) for nostalgia reasons, not for financial ones.

    As for the guitars I have now, I often pick one up at a pawn shop, play it for a few years and then sell it back to the pawn shop when something else catches my eye.

    • #22318

      Master Killer
      Participant

      Yeah PaulWolfe, isn’t it funny how that stuff goes. I never liked Ibanez guitars. I learned (for the most part) on a Fender Strat. The Ibanezes sold for booku bucks because Vai and Satriani played them. When I would play an Ibanez it was like taking two steps backward. The neck seemed too thick and fretty. Kramers always had a good feel to them but they were pretty pricey too. Maybe because for a time Van Halen used one? I found ESP guitars to be unremarkable but hey, George Lynch played them. And Hamer? I never really understood why those things were priced the way they were.

      Cheap Guitars (with some exceptions) play just about as good as expensive ones. It's your ability combined with an awesome amp that makes the difference.

  • #22279

    DanzoStrife
    Participant

    ^Yea, I know right. I’m a player, not a museum looker. I mean, I have online guitar galleries for that shit 😛
    That’s why I like to keep my guitars pristine looking, so i can have best of both worlds.

    I recently saw the 2nd made Jackson Soloist guitars sold from Jeff Hannemans collection post mortem. Take note the signature Japan series goes for $5000 retail. This guitar, Jeff personally played himself and kept in very good condition since he owned it only for a few months sold for $4000 on Ebay.
    That’s not a profit! The guitar was already obtained at high price from a broker, so this is either a loss or no profit.

  • #22282

    DanzoStrife
    Participant

    When I think of “Investment” I think of buy the best possible guitar for YOU. Something that will be an extension of your playing, feel right and sound right in your hands. So thinking of it this way, a poorly crafted beginners guitar with sharp frets that cut ur fingers, poor setup and playability may not be suitable. In fact what happens is a good portion of players will lose interest in the sound and feel of this guitar, get frustrated and quit.

    Might as well spend on something that suits your needs better. Like $300, rather than $100.

    Even tho u don’t make much profit on used guitars, a $100 used guitar is basically shit with misaligned neck and u can barely hand that thing out for free and definitely not resell and upgrade to a better guitar. It’s $100 lost forever, or donated to charity.

    It’s possible u can get $100 used guitar off the market that’s GOOD, but I’m talking about a $100 retail new guitar, only a few of those ever are worth buying.

  • #22317

    Master Killer
    Participant

    Back in the day I was a regular at guitar shops. They always wouldn’t initially let you touch the premium models but the longer I hung around and they heard me play and knew I was serious eventually I got my hands on them. I tried the top of the line Jackson RR1 I believe it was list price (1990) was around $2200.The thing with all those high end models is that there’s always something you don’t like about them. With the RR it  was the pickups were too “metalized” and had too much crunch. I prefer a more vintage and brighter pickup because when I would play fast with the amount of general distortion I used I had trouble hearing the individual notes because of too much background fuzz. The prospect of paying what at the time amounted to the price of a fairly good used auto for a guitar that I was going to have to swap out pickups on was not appealing to say the least. Also on lots of those high enders’ a thorough inspection of the electronics bay reveals cheap, ceramic capacitors and  dime a dozen pots. I would dare wager that my Hondo Rhoads knock off I’m working on now will compete with and possibly out play the original when I’m done. Back then modding a guitar was an expensive venture because that knowledge was guarded and trust me, you could have made a good living in my home town doing custom work on guitars. Nowadays that stuff’s all on youtube and most people do their own work.

    It’s quite possible to pick up a guitar off Reverb or Ebay for 100 – $200 and for a couple hundred more mod it out to sound as good as a high end model.

    Cheap Guitars (with some exceptions) play just about as good as expensive ones. It's your ability combined with an awesome amp that makes the difference.

  • #22326

    Master Killer
    Participant

    Hey any of you old timers remember the Alvarez “Dana Scoop”?

    I’d truly love to have one of those but they sell for around 800 bucks a piece now.

    Cheap Guitars (with some exceptions) play just about as good as expensive ones. It's your ability combined with an awesome amp that makes the difference.

  • #22336

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    It seems like, with this tendency of guitarists to constantly trade around to play ‘new’ guitars (or ‘new’ pedals too), and losing money on every one of these in the resale process, that playing guitar sure is an expensive habit. Constantly negative ROI, not even close to break even.

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #22338

    DanzoStrife
    Participant

    ^ That’s sorta like long term rental . Is it better to keep a few guitars then? I think it’s better to keep a few than keep selling. Just keep a guitar for each purpose.

    Like some of u guys are telling me to sell my guitar if I don’t like something about it, but then every guitar I like has something I don’t like about it.

  • #22342

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    Hey any of you old timers remember the Alvarez “Dana Scoop”? I’d truly love to have one of those but they sell for around 800 bucks a piece now.

    I remember liking the idea when they came out, but never saw one in a store. Phil McKnight did a video on them a little while back:

    • #22348

      Master Killer
      Participant

      I only saw one in a shop once. There was this guy Named Stan Hendricks in my hometown who owned a Radio Shack. Stan was a player (though not that great) and he was the supplier of my first guitar equipment. Stan carried Westones (later Alvarez when they bought Westone) and Series10 which was a cheap, beginners model guitar (which at the time all came with reverse head stocks which I hated, thank you George Lynch!) and Crate amps which at the time sounded like butt. Stan had a Dana but not a Scoop. It was basically the Dana with no scoop. He always wanted to get a scoop but like me money was a consideration as they were quite expensive by the standards then. I have several things on my wish list before Christmas one is a Fender Dual Showman 100 Watt Tube head and cabinet, A Hondo Death Dagger guitar, and a Dana Scoop (hopefully a red sunburst model). There’s usually always one on Ebay or Reverb and they run anywhere from 600-$800 depending on the condition.

      Cheap Guitars (with some exceptions) play just about as good as expensive ones. It's your ability combined with an awesome amp that makes the difference.

  • #22343

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    ^ That’s sorta like long term rental . Is it better to keep a few guitars then? I think it’s better to keep a few than keep selling. Just keep a guitar for each purpose. Like some of u guys are telling me to sell my guitar if I don’t like something about it, but then every guitar I like has something I don’t like about it.

    I like the idea of settling on a main guitar that’s something easy to find affordably off-the-rack, so the guitar you’re “used to” is always easily replaceable. To me, that means a cheap strat or similar, maybe with upgraded pickups/tuners/bridge. The Indonesian-made Ibanez’s have become an interesting value-priced option.

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