HomeForumsMeet and GreetDo you consider guitars as investments?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  MotleyCrue81 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #21551

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Just wondering, it seems many guitar players consider guitars to be an investment (buy it, play it, sell it later perhaps for profit or money back). I think this changes a lot of how people might choose an instrument to play. How do you guys view your guitars? Personally I don’t consider resale value for gear, I just get what I think I need at the time, tho that’s probably because I’m lousy at selling/trading stuff.

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21553

    bdickens
    Participant

    To me, they are utilitarian.

     

     

    Byron Dickens

  • #21557

    Igglepud
    Participant

    They are not a financial investment for me.

    MY ROCK IS FIERCE!!!

  • #21559

    safetyblitz
    Participant

    Just wondering, it seems many guitar players consider guitars to be an investment (buy it, play it, sell it later perhaps for profit or money back). I think this changes a lot of how people might choose an instrument to play. How do you guys view your guitars? Personally I don’t consider resale value for gear, I just get what I think I need at the time, tho that’s probably because I’m lousy at selling/trading stuff.

    With very rare exceptions, guitars generally depreciate in value rather than appreciate.

    While the expected useful life of a guitar is generally longer than an automobile, I think there are a lot of parallels between the two markets.

    What I do see is people often buying guitars the same way they buy non-collectible automobiles: they consider how much of its value they might expect to recoup on the used market if they decide they want something else.

    And boutique guitars are probably like boutique autos: the price may fluctuate unpredictably based on the whim of the market at any given time, but it’s impossible to predict reliably which niche examples may become highly sought after in the future. Mere scarcity itself is no guarantee of future value.

  • #21560

    superblonde
    Keymaster

    Well, my guitar series was discontinued yet has a following.. I see the price has appreciated on the sale sites, I paid $600 now I see it going for like $800-$850 or even more. But I always figured I would smash it someday, not re-sell it 😀

    I'm an intermediate student of Metal Method. I play seitannic heavy metal. All Kale Seitan! The glutens will be eaten with relish!
    And on the Seventh Day, Mustaine said: ∇ ⨯ E = - ∂B / ∂t ; and there was Thrash; and it had a ♭3; and it was good.

  • #21561

    MotleyCrue81
    Participant

    Depends on if it’s a top of the line guitar with certain characteristics that is no longer available. Also depends on if you get famous or not haha. Maybe my 1989 Epiphone G-300 will be worth something one day because it’s the only year with the headstock style and was made in one of the good Korea plants but I doubt it’ll be worth anything substantial. My RRXMG will probably only ever go down and my custom one will be worth a ton – to me haha.

    Bring hair metal back!

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